Bombardier Launches Innovative New 50-Seat Regional Aircraft

Bombardier Commercial Aircraft has announced the launch of a completely new regional jet. The new CRJ550, the first triple-class 50-seat aircraft in the world designed to offer more comfort to today’s regional airline passengers. The CRJ550 is a new CRJ Series aircraft model, based on the CRJ700. United Airlines is the launch customer of this new model, and the new aircraft will be flown by United Express carrier GoJet.

“The new CRJ550 model is the only solution in North America that can replace the existing fleet of ageing 50-seaters, a market of over 700 aircraft, said Fred Cromer, President, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft. It offers improved passenger experience with ample on-board storage for carry-on bags and more passenger living space. This is one more example of how we are focusing on creating value for our customers and a very important endorsement from United in regards to the CRJ platform.”

The CRJ550 will feature a self-serve beverage and snack station and more overall legroom per seat than any other 50-seat aircraft flown by any U.S. carrier, in addition to all the benefits for which the CRJ Series aircraft are known.

Aircraft manufacturers are developing new aircraft in response to the expanding airline industry around the world, driven by the record number of passengers who want to fly to their destinations. This expansion has created an incredible demand for new airline pilots and created opportunities to become airline pilots and fly for the airlines.

ATP graduates are meeting and exceeding their career objectives and positioning themselves for multi-million dollar careers flying for the airlines and programs such as ATP’s Tuition Reimbursement Program are helping them succeed. These pilots will arrive for new-hire training at these airlines ahead of their competition, and enjoy all the benefits of greater seniority, because they chose to train with the school that has a thirty-year history of setting pilots on the path to success: ATP.