An Important Part of Every Flight

We have written many times on PilotJobs.com about the acute shortage of qualified pilots to fly for the airlines. Although the news hasn’t spread quite as far, there is also a shortage of other specialists required to run an airline safely. Airline professionals such as Certified Aircraft Dispatchers, mechanics and technicians are also in short supply, and they are very important parts of any airline’s team.

I’ve worked with these professionals closely over the years that I have flown for the airlines, both as a First Officer and a Captain. I have gained the most help though from the Certified Aircraft Dispatchers that I worked with on every single flight. These dispatchers were our eyes and ears on the ground while we flew the trip, and helped plan the flight before the crew even boarded to get the aircraft ready to fly.

Most people who fly as passengers are not even aware of the important job that dispatchers do, handling all of the details that make for a safe and successful flight. They plan how each flight will handle weather problems enroute to a flight’s destination as well as any other problems a crew may face both in the air and on the ground during a flight. A flight’s dispatcher will stay focused on the flight and follow its progress, as well as communicate with both the crew and ground personnel about potential problems ahead and the plan to deal with them. In essence, the flight could not be safely completed without a competent dispatcher on the team. Take a look at the “Aircraft Dispatcher’s Role Inside Look video” to see what I mean.

To address the growing need for new Certified Aircraft Dispatchers to come into the industry, ATP is offering the Aircraft Dispatcher Training Program for people interested in this exciting and well-paid career. On average, the annual beginning salary for a dispatcher at a regional airline ranges between $28,000 and $32,000. After several years of experience, salaries can exceed $100,000 with managers attaining even higher pay at the regional airline.

Beginning as an assistant dispatcher with a major airline you will likely have a base salary of around $40,000. Considering shift differentials and other contractual bonuses, senior dispatchers can make in excess of $130,000 annually. Benefits usually include medical and dental insurance, life insurance, stock purchase options and retirement plans. Many companies offer free flight benefits for their dispatchers plus free or reduced fares for their families.

ATP has been training pilots for the airline industry for over 30 successful years. We are now applying the same high standards of training to Certified Aircraft Dispatchers. When getting the job is important, as well as being trained to excel at your new job, count on ATP as thousands of airline employees have done over the past 30 years. Get there ahead of your competition with ATP.