Another Airline Pilot’s Success Story

ATP is a flight training academy which has traditionally trained pilots to fly for the airlines, and has been more successful at it than any other flight training entity in this country. As the Director of the advanced jet training arm of ATP, as well as a former Captain in the airlines, I get the real pleasure of helping many pilots take that final important step to flying for an airline.

We get many letters thanking us for our efforts, and I want to share one with you. Not because we are mentioned but because it is a good example of what ATP does for our pilots:

To: Jim Koziarski,
Vice President of Operations
Airline Transport Professionals

Dear Jim,

Good day to you. I wanted to write you a letter in reference to Paul Templeton. I tend to be hyper-explanatory so please indulge me as I have one simple point to make.

My name is Matthew Blake Langley and I am a former ATP student. My time with ATP spans from 2008 when I completed the ACPP program all the way to 2012 when I completed the CRJ program.

When I completed my initial flight training, given the economic climate in 2008 and the status of the airlines, I immediately returned to my career as a Firefighter and just used my ratings to fly as a side job. (Expensive hobby, I know).

Fast forward to 2012, back in February I placed a call to ATP and just asked what was involved with the RJ Program. I had no serious intent to take the class as I have spent the last 4 years buying a home, starting a family and knowing that I would never be an airline pilot. I was inquisitive, albeit skeptical of the whole idea that I could get to the airlines. Immediately Paul responded with an exclamation of “Yes, you can.” Ok, I get it…this guy is here to sell me a seat right? I asked the standard questions, thanked him for his time and then hung up. Two days later Paul called me back. He did not call to ask me to sign the dotted line, but to see if I had any more questions. Paul and I spoke and through our conversations Paul made me a believer once again in the dream I have always had. He gave me the confidence that I would be an outstanding asset to any airline based on my work history, flight time and experience. Paul endured my schedule changes, canceled plans and even lost mail to get me in class. After all, that’s what he wants right? To sell me a seat?

I couldn’t have been more WRONG.

I bought into the ACP program from internet brochures. It’s no secret, if you Google “Flight School”, guess who pops up? But I bought into the RJ Program because of one man’s promise to be a personal asset to my future. Paul checked on me daily while I was in training despite the fact that he was on vacation for spring break. He called my instructors each day and when I finished the class he went straight to work sending out my resume and personally delivering “Blake as a total package.” I received phone calls from THREE airlines within a week and even more within the month. As soon as I finished my first interview (ExpressJet) Paul asked me, “Okay. Which one you want next?” I was floored. I got my interview; technically he doesn’t have to help me anymore right? Every email I sent, he responded. Every call I placed, he returned. Just how many people does he have to help with this process anyways? It sure seemed like I was the only one. Now, less than three months after my first skeptical phone call, I got a class date with ExpressJet. The first thing that popped into my head was, “I could not have done it without Paul.” His counsel prepared me mentally, psychologically, professionally and even technically. There is no shortage of words to purvey my gratitude to this man. You all are lucky to have him.

Paul Templeton did not just “do his job.” I see people that just do the minimum every day. He went beyond all expectations. If, in my travels with ExpressJet I find myself in Florida, I owe this man a steak dinner. I know this will happen because when I call him up, he will answer.

Thank you for your time.

Matthew B Langley
Firefighter-Paramedic and soon to be “Rookie Pilot”