Corporate Aviation is Taking Off

Business aviation professionals believe that business aviation is set for recovery this year, rather than the 2012 turnaround predicted by most forecasters late last year. According to business aviation consultant Rolland Vincent, “The darkest days of this current downturn appear to be in the past.”


BizJet

Vincent points to rising corporate profits, increased
business aircraft usage and the fact that corporate aviation aircraft deliveries
in the first nine months of last year were the fourth highest on record as
signs that things are rapidly improving. Meanwhile, corporate aviation consultant
Brian Foley said recently, “Our perspective is that mid-2011 will be the first
time since 2007 that all segments of the industry will be simultaneously
improving.”

Corporate aviation is on the rise around the country, with the frequency of corporate
flights up about 10 percent in 2010, following a dismal 2009 in which business
fell by almost a third. Business people traveling on commercial airlines is
also increasing, with business-class spending up 60 percent in the third
quarter, according to American Express Business Insights, the analytics arm of the credit card company.

The revival of Corporate Aviation will translate into more
Corporate Pilots being hired and trained to fly BizJets. These Corporate Flight
Departments usually look for resumes that include a lot of Multi-engine flight
experience
and Regional
Airline experience
.

Business executives are finding that flying in their own Corporate
Aircraft is the most convenient way to travel to meetings, he said, and are
filling planes with more executives and salespeople since it doesn’t cost more
to add passengers.

“They’re trying to accomplish a lot more on each trip,’’
Cawley said. “A lot of our customers, I would say they’re midsize businesses,
so it’s very important for them to watch their dollars.’’

“Travel in Corporate Aircraft has become more crucial for
companies in the past year because of all the airline cutbacks during the
recession,” said Ed Bolen, president of the National Business Aviation
Association. “With limited or no commercial service in some communities,
private jets are often the most convenient — and sometimes the only — way for
companies to get to a location.”

“I think there’s a sense that it’s a luxury, that it’s not a
necessity, that it’s rock stars and fat cats that are flying around on these
private jets,’’ said Bowlen “Our clients are not fat cats and rock stars,
they’re three business people flying to a meeting to close a deal.’’